Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta MOTOWN SINGLES (FLAC). Mostrar todas las entradas
Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta MOTOWN SINGLES (FLAC). Mostrar todas las entradas

junio 20, 2017

The Complete MOTOWN SINGLES Volume 1 - 1959 - 1961 (FLAC)


Product description:-
Berry Gordy’s empire began even before the house at 2648 W. Grand Blvd. became ‘Hitsville U.S.A.’ The Complete Motown Singles, Part 1: 1959-1961 documents Motown’s earliest days, from Marv Johnson’s “Come To Me” on Tamla 101 through The Twistin’ Kings’ “Congo (Part 1)” on Motown 1023.
This six-CD set offers an amazing insight into the development of the Motown Sound. You can follow along, single by single, as Gordy pursues his dream, often to unexpected places. It features the A-side and B-side of every single released by Motown and its subsidiaries during the label’s first three years of existence. Over the course of the set’s 155 tracks, you can hear the recorded debuts of the Temptations, the Supremes, Mary Wells, and many others.

The luxurious packaging resembles a scaled-down 78-rpm-era “album,” with cardboard sleeves to hold each of the discs, and 92 pages of rare photos, detailed annotations and scholarly - as well as personal – liner notes. It also features a reproduction 45-rpm single from its era; in this case, it’s Barrett Strong’s “Money” b/w “Oh I Apologize.” Berry Gordy, who co-wrote and co-produced nearly every track in this first set, contributes a brief, personally signed note in the booklet’s opening page. It introduces an eyewitness account of the early days from singer Mable John, the first female solo act signed to Motown.
Also included is a historical overview by author and scholar Craig Werner of the University of Wisconsin, and track-by-track annotations, with not just song credits but stories and context of each song, by noted authors and discographers Bill Dahl and Keith Hughes.
 
The Complete Motown Singles, Volume 1: 1959-1961 is a limited-edition set. Most of the songs contained on it are unavailable anywhere else; many had never been re-released on vinyl, let alone on compact disc. When the edition is sold out, it’s gone for good, so act now. Keep in mind, too, that this Volume 1 is the first step in a proposed 12-part series.

febrero 06, 2017

THE COMPLETE MOTOWN SINGLES, VOL. 12A: 1972 (FLAC)



Release Date: May 31, 2013
CD Edition limited to 7500 non-numbered limited edition copies.

The Complete Motown Singles, the acclaimed, long-running series encompassing every Motown single release of the Detroit era, begins its final phase this year with Volume 12A, a 5-disc set of the company’s output from the first half of 1972. The collection contains 113 remastered tracks with a 130-page book that chronicles the story of the year in which Motown uprooted from Hitsville and moved west.

enero 07, 2016

THE COMPLETE MOTOWN SINGLES, VOL. 12B: 1972 (320 kbps)

Release Date: Dec 10, 2013
CD Edition limited to 7500 non-numbered limited edition copies.

This 5-CD set brings the acclaimed series to an end, with 100 classic & rare tracks. The Complete Motown Singles, an acclaimed, multi-disc series covering the companys wide-ranging and massively successful output from 1959-1972, comes to its conclusion with the release of Volume 12B, a 5-disc set of the companys output from the last half of 1972.

diciembre 29, 2015

THE COMPLETE MOTOWN SINGLES, VOL. 11B: 1971 (FLAC)

 

Release Date: January 20th, 2009

CD Edition limited to 8000 limited edition copies.

Motown proudly presents the newest installment in the critically acclaimed, continuing series of every Motown single of the Detroit era, this time a 5-disc set, 

THE COMPLETE MOTOWN SINGLES, VOL. 11A: 1971 (FLAC)

 
RELEASE DATE: November 18, 2008

CD Edition limited to 8000 limited edition copies.

Motown presents the newest installment in the critically acclaimed, continuing series of every Motown single of the Detroit era, this time a 5-disc set chronicling the emergence of a “new” Motown, with 119 tracks in another eye-catching package. The Complete Motown Singles Vol. 11A: 1971, a 5-CD set, covers just the first six months of the year, is chock full of those wider-world stories and the great music during a period when the company, too, was undergoing its own reconstruction. The optimism of the sixties had been shattered by race riots, assassinations, escalation of the Vietnam War and political instability. Desegregation through busing was become a hot issue. President Richard Nixon formally recognized the Congressional Black Caucus for the first time

diciembre 28, 2015

The Complete MOTOWN SINGLES Volume 10 - 1970 (FLAC)


 


RELEASE DATE: June 27, 2008

CD Edition limited to 8000 limited edition copies.

In 1970, Motown was experiencing sea changes. Diana Ross went solo while the Supremes went Top 10 without her. Jacksonmania was in full effect. Stevie Wonder began producing himself. Rare Earth had an unexpected hit and so did the Miracles, forcing Smokey Robinson to put on hold his departure from the group. Tammi Terrell died, finally succumbing to the effects of a brain tumor. Marvin Gaye was refusing to record or perform, but he produced another hit for the Originals. Los Angeles producer Frank Wilson had established himself in Detroit and set about creating a concept album for the Four Tops. In addition, Motown’s core staff had moved into the Motown Center building on Woodward Avenue. The company closed its Artist Development Department. 


The Complete MOTOWN SINGLES Volume 9 - 1969 (FLAC)

 


RELEASE DATE: December 6th 2007
CD Edition limited to 6000 limited edition copies.

Even as the world rolled on like a ball of confusion, it was a new morning for “The Sound of Young America” in 1969. That story is in full flower on The Complete Motown Singles, Vol. 9: 1969, a 6-CD set that’s the latest installment in the acclaimed series from Motown


diciembre 27, 2015

The Complete MOTOWN SINGLES Volume 8 - 1968 (FLAC)





1968: A year of tragic assassinations that greatly affect the country, of musical controversies with “Love Child” and “Cloud Nine,” another “Grapevine,” and an improbable Motor City triumph—the Detroit Tigers win the World Series. This 6-disc set chronicles that year by way of 144 tracks representing every A- and B-side of every Motown single, plus the stories behind every track, along with critical and personal essays providing overviews of the era.

The Complete Motown Singles Vol. 8: 1968 documents the introduction of several new artists, including Bobby Taylor & The Vancouvers, whose hit, “Does Your Mama Know About Me,” aroused more controversy. It was also the year the company paired Diana Ross and the Supremes with the “new” Temptations, who sport a new lead singer, Dennis Edwards. They hit big with the duet “I’m Gonna Make You Love Me.” They were then seen on TCB, a groundbreaking, prime-time program that was Motown’s first-ever television co-production and the highest-rated prime-time special of that year.

Marvin Gaye became Motown’s hottest-selling act when “I Heard It Through The Grapevine” stayed a No. 1 smash for months. Its success was vindication for producer Norman Whitfield, who recorded Gaye’s version before the previous year’s hit version by Gladys Knight & the Pips. Its release was denied for more than a year.

The year ended on an extraordinary note. During Christmas week 1968, Motown had five singles in the Top 10: “I Heard It Through The Grapevine,” Stevie Wonders’s “For Once In My Life,” the Supremes’ “Love Child,” “I’m Gonna Make You Love Me” and the Temptations’ “Cloud Nine.”

The Complete Motown Singles Vol. 8: 1968 is packaged in a mini-78-RPM album format with, as usual, an actual 45-RPM vinyl single in the front sleeve. For this year it’s Marvin’s “Grapevine” on Tamla, to bookend with Volume 7’s “Grapevine” by Gladys Knight on Soul. Accompanying the six CDs is a 132-page booklet stuffed with rare photos, memorabilia, detailed track annotation and two evocative essays.

The Complete MOTOWN SINGLES Volume 7 - 1967 (FLAC)





Continuing series of every Motown single of the Detroit era. With 120 tracks on five compact discs, this box set chronicles a pivotal year for "The Sound Of Young America."

It’s Motown’s ninth year in existence, and “Hitsville USA” is now rolling – fully three-quarters of all of its single A-side releases hit the charts. All of those hits are in this volume, of course, as well as – as promised – every B-side, every planned single, every alternate pressing, each mastered from the original singles masters in the Motown vault.

Motown was not simply having more hits; its output was just getting better.
“The irresistible charm of early Motown was still conspicuous, but the songwriting and production techniques had been sharpened… to make each record better than the last,” write author and Detroit native Herb Jordan in his fabulous booklet essay.

It’s the year Marvin Gaye, losing out on a live album release of standards, is paired with Tammi Terrell. They’re given songs by newcomers Ashford & Simpson. It’s the year producer Norman Whitfield, with a returning Barrett Strong, loses out on a release of Gaye’s version of “I Heard It Through The Grapevine,” so he cuts a new one on Gladys Knight & The Pips. The Supremes, still making No. 1 records, officially become “Diana Ross &…” Martha & The Vandellas add “Reeves…” The Miracles formalize “Smokey Robinson &…” It’s the year of Motown’s first annual sales convention, ably described in a personal essay by Barney Ales, Motown’s head of sales during the era.

It’s also the year of fractured relationships, as Florence Ballad leaves the Supremes. As Holland-Dozier-Holland plan to leave Motown. And as the summer explodes with riots in downtown Detroit. But the great songs keep coming.

The story of Motown in 1967 is all here, over five discs. Included are rare cuts, promo-only singles, and several surprising alternate mixes, from Stevie Wonder’s “I’m Wondering” to the Temptations B-side, “I Truly, Truly Believe,” with a forgotten alternate lead vocal! The fantastic packaging includes essays by Jordan and Ales, as well as the extraordinary track-by-track details by Keith Hughes and Bill Dahl the series is known for. Also featured are rare photos and classic Motown record ads.

The Complete MOTOWN SINGLES Volume 6 - 1966 (FLAC)


 This (once again) awesome set chronicles 1966, when 22 Motown A-sides reached the Top 20 and, quite remarkably, three-quarters of all Motown releases land someplace on the charts.

This is the year “The Sound of Young America” becomes an official slogan. When H-D-H and their brothers & sisters in music and spirited competition are making more sophisticated strides. The Supremes have four no. 1 hits in a row – again. The Four Tops hit no. 1 with “Reach Out I’ll Be There,” what many consider the greatest Motown record ever. When new artists from the Isley Brothers to Gladys Knight & The Pips make some mighty Motown noise – and another new act, those crazy kids called the Mynah Birds, make a helluva rock ’n’ soul record but it gets shuffled aside. (Well, until now).

The Complete Motown Singles, Vol. 6: 1966, the latest release in this acclaimed series, showcases the exploding success of the classic label on a 5-CD, 125-track set. It features the A-side and B-side of every single released by Motown and its subsidiary labels during the year, including several alternate pressings. This volume is highlighted by hits from the Tops, the Supremes, the Temptations, the Isleys, Stevie Wonder, Jimmy “Brokenhearted” Ruffin, Martha & The Vandellas and more. Also included are rare tracks by Tammi Terrell, the Spinners, Billy “Mr. B” Eckstine, Earl Van Dyke, Rick Robin & Him, the LaSalles and many more. Among the fascinating obscurities is “The Teen Beat Song,” Marvin Gaye’s ode to the Detroit Free Press.

As with all previous volumes, packaging for the set resembles a scaled-down 78-rpm-era “album,” with cardboard sleeves to hold each of the discs, and 112 pages of rare photos and extensive liner notes. Each box will feature an actual reproduction 45 RPM single of the Four Tops’ smash, “Reach Out I’ll Be There” b/w “Until You Love Someone.” (Yes, it plays!)

Introducing the package is a vivid, personal essay by Motown songwriter (and former artist) Edward Holland, Jr., who remembers 1966 as his busiest year ever.  “I was so strongly caught up in the moment that I didn’t fully grasp what was happening to me or around me,” he writes. “Motown was on warp speed. We were young and enjoying what we were doing so much. It was never like work in the first place.”

Also included is a historical overview by Stu Hackel, a regular chronicler of Motown and soul music, who makes a strong case for Motown’s underappreciated political and musical influence. Track-by-track annotations have been written by noted authors and researchers Bill Dahl and Keith Hughes, with assistance by UMe VP Harry Weinger, who has overseen the series.

Only 6000 copies of this limited-edition box set will ever be manufactured.

diciembre 23, 2015

The Complete MOTOWN SINGLES Volume 5 - 1965 (FLAC)


1965, the latest volume in the acclaimed continuing series of every Motown single (A- and B- side) of the Detroit era.  With 166 songs on six compact discs, the box set chronicles the arrival of “The Motown Sound” into the mainstream.  Vol. 5 features no. 1 hits from The Supremes’ “Back In My Arms Again” (their fifth chart-topper in a row) to the Four Tops’ “I Can’t Help Myself (Sugar Pie Honey Bunch),” from Jr. Walker & The All Stars’ breakthrough no. 1 hit “Shotgun” to Marvin Gaye’s “I’ll Be Doggone,” a revived Stevie Wonder’s “Uptight (Everything’s Alright)” to nearly no. 1’s from The Miracles’ “Going To A Go-Go,” “Ooo Baby Baby” and many more.

There’s also the emergence of young Tammi Terrell, the uptown soul of Brenda Holloway and Kim Weston, the pop crossover experiments with Tony Martin and Barbara McNair, plus rare singles from Earl Van Dyke & The Soul Brothers, the Freeman Brothers, the Lewis Sisters, the Headliners, Chris Clark, the Downbeats and the holy grail of Motown collecting, Frank Wilson’s “Do I Love You (Indeed I Do).” As with previous volumes, also included for several tracks are alternate promotional mixes, different from the commercially available vinyl singles.

This was the year that Berry Gordy realized one of his dreams for Motown: to break down racial barriers. The Supremes, with their many No. 1 Pop hits, were the vehicle;  they headlined at New York’s prestigious Copacabana;  appeared on the cover of Time magazine; were regulars on popular national television shows all year. The social atmosphere is reflected in both introductory essays, found in the box set’s 148-page booklet.  Al Abrams, who was Motown Records’ first employee and was then the company’s publicity director, spins an honest tale of his PR struggles as well as the fun in the midst of changing times. Author Herb Boyd, winner of the American Book Award, presents a socio-political view, weaving his experiences with Malcolm X, the Voting Rights Act and personal reflection with reporting on Motown’s emerging business.

As with previous volumes, The Complete Motown Singles, Volume 5: 1965 is a limited-edition set. Several of the songs contained on it are unavailable anywhere else; many had never been re-released on vinyl, let alone on compact disc. When the edition is sold out, it’s gone for good, so act now.

The Complete MOTOWN SINGLES Volume 4 - 1964 (FLAC)


We're happy to present the next volume in the acclaimed continuing series of every Motown single (A- and B- side) of the Detroit era. The Complete Motown Singles, Volume 4: 1964, with 163 songs on six compact discs, focuses on the year the company becomes an international phenomenon. Even as the Motown machine began to click founder Berry Gordy continued to hedge his bets: listen for odd novelties like the seasonal “Randy, The Newspaper Boy” by Ray Oddis, and “Set Me Free” by radio personality Lee Alan. Motown kept active its country label, Mel-O-Dy, from Gene Henslee’s weeper “Shambles” to Howard Crockett’s passable Johnny Cash impersonation on “My Lil’s Run Off.” There’s even Bruce Channel, hot from his smash pop hit, “Hey! Baby,” trying out a Snakepit groove on his R&B-country update of “Satisfied Mind.” Marvin Gaye is given a long leash to test his jazz sensibilities. Sammy Ward has a last shot at the blues.
 
Every detail is here, in a package keeping with the series that also boasts an expanded 132-page booklet. The Supremes’ first of three No. 1 hits that year, “Where Did Our Love Go” b/w “He Means The World To Me,” is the true vinyl single in the box set’s cover page. Inside, page after page features rare photographs. There are faithful reproductions of classic (and some not so classic) picture sleeves and record labels, some seen for the first time since they were first released.

Janie Bradford, a Motown songwriter who was the company’s front desk receptionist that year, wrote an introductory essay for The Complete Motown Singles, Volume 4. Her observations from behind that desk are poetic and often funny; she offers an insider’s look at Motown climbing on a rocketship. Dr. Todd Boyd, a Detroit native and today the Katherine and Frank Price Endowed Chair for the Study of Race and Popular Culture at the USC School of Cinema-Television, is the author of this year’s overview; he places Motown and the music in a broiling historical context that includes Cassius Clay (Muhammed Ali), the aftermath of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination, Malcolm X, Freedom Summer, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Thanks to associate producer Keith Hughes and author Bill Dahl, each track gets a story, with the usual songwriters and producers, now with recording dates where available, and extraordinary research that has uncovered long-lost – or never before revealed – insights about the music and the people who made it.

The Complete MOTOWN SINGLES Volume 3 - 1963 (FLAC)




By 1963, Berry Gordy and company were fine-tuning Motown’s sound. Jumping on the charts were Martha & The Vandellas, with “Come And Get These Memories” and “Heat Wave,” signalling the emergence of the writing/production team Holland-Dozier-Holland. “Little” Stevie Wonder was No.1 with the record-breaking “Fingertips (Part 2).” Mary Wells’ “You Lost The Sweetest Boy” and “What’s Easy For Two Is So Hard For One” turned out to be a double-sided hit. The Supremes (finally!) made their Top 40 chart debut.
 
All of these songs, and so many more, are included on this third volume of The Complete Motown Singles.

This five-CD set captures the hits and the misses during the label’s fifth year of existence. It features the A-side and B-side of every single released by Motown and its subsidiaries during the high-growth phase of Detroit’s entertainment juggernaut. Over the course of the set’s 119 tracks, you can hear The Chuck-A-Lucks and Jack Haney & “Nikiter” Armstrong with a couple of Cold War novelties, Martha & The Vandellas following one hit natural disaster (“Heat Wave”) with another (“Quicksand”), and an outstanding Holland-Dozier-Holland production (The Marvelettes’ “Locking Up My Heart”) that should have been a much bigger hit than it was. Leaving the fold were the Workshop Jazz, Divinity and Miracle labels; new to the company was the V.I.P. imprint.

The set is bound in a scaled-down 78-rpm-era “album,” with cardboard sleeves to hold each of the discs, and 92 pages of rare photos, detailed annotations and scholarly – as well as personal – liner notes. It also features a reproduction 45-rpm single from its era; in this case, it’s Martha & The Vandellas’ “(Love Is Like A) Heat Wave” b/w “A Love Like Yours (Don’t Come Knockin’ Every Day).” Martha Reeves contributes a personal essay to the set detailing the artist’s-eye-view of life in the label’s early years. Also included is an historical overview by author and scholar Craig Werner, and, as in previous volumes, copious track-by-track annotations painstakingly researched by noted authors and discographers Bill Dahl and Keith Hughes. 


The Complete MOTOWN SINGLES Volume 2 - 1962 (FLAC)



By 1962, Motown wasn’t yet the hit factory it would later become but  had regular chart success and were reaching across the ocean to influence the emerging British Invasion. The year marked the debut of four new imprints in the Motown empire: Divinity, Workshop, Mel-o-dy, and Gordy.  This four-CD set offers a miraculous peek behind the curtains of what was rapidly becoming “The Sound Of Young America.” It features the A-side and B-side of every single released by Motown and its subsidiaries during the label’s fourth year of existence. Over the course of the set’s 112 tracks, you can hear The Temptations masquerading as The Pirates, the vocal version of the “Theme From Exodus,” and the phone number that was on the lips of America: “Beechwood 4-5789,” courtesy of the Marvelettes.

The opulent packaging resembles a scaled-down 78-rpm-era “album,” with cardboard sleeves to hold each of the discs, and 88 pages of rare photos, detailed annotations and scholarly - as well as personal - liner notes. It also features a reproduction 45-rpm single from its era; in this case, it’s Mary Wells’ “You Beat Me To The Punch” b/w “Old Love (Let’s Try It Again).” Claudette Robinson, a member of The Miracles and Smokey’s ex-wife, contributed a personal essay to the set detailing the artist’s-eye-view of life in the label’s early years. Also included is an historical overview by author and scholar Gerald Early of Washington University in St. Louis, and track-by-track annotations, with not just song credits but stories behind each song, by noted authors and discographers Bill Dahl and Keith Hughes.

The Complete Motown Singles, Volume 2: 1962 is a limited-edition set. Most of the songs contained on it are unavailable anywhere else; many had never been re-released on vinyl, let alone on compact disc. When the edition is sold out, it’s gone for good.